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Germy Public Hot Tubs – Tips You Need to Know Before You Soak

Germy Public Hot Tubs – Tips You Need to Know Before You Soak
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Let’s talk on the very important element of our body, vitamin G. G means the germs free body and also some fluids and steps which can prevent us from devoting our self to the famous and publicly germy places. We generally, have the senses and pride of being the most hygienic guys and usually avoid anything unsophisticated and unhygienic. But have you ever thought before jumping in the pool party or even in the public hot tubs or the gymkhana tubs.

I’ve always been suspicious of public hot tubs or Jacuzzis, Whirlpools or whatever you call them in your area of the country/world. Here is an assertion of a health club owner (don’t read if you really love gym hot tubs, your love will get hurt).

Germy Public Hot Tubs – Tips You Need to Know Before You Soak

“Having owned health clubs I can tell you the most disgusting place in a gym is the whirlpool … “We would drain the whirlpool often to clean it. Tampons, rubbers, panty liners, band aids, fake nails, toe nails, mice etc. I would often wonder why people would ‘bathe’ with perfect strangers.”

Germy Public Hot Tubs - Tips You Need to Know Before You Soakso this is all unsubstantiated, so I decided to do some digging around, and what I found wasn’t exactly reassuring. Some facts about public hot-tubing (better put your sandwich down before proceeding):

It’s like taking a bath–with a stranger: “When you are in the water you are bathing with everyone else in the pool, Water Park, hot tub, spa, lake, river, or ocean,” say the experts at the Medical College of Wisconsin. “Germs in contaminated water can enter your system if you accidentally swallow the water, and can cause infection in your eyes, nose, ears, as well as in cuts and scrapes.”

Chlorine doesn’t always kill off all harmful germs. “Chlorine does a good job of killing most germs, but it does not sterilize the water,” they continue. “A few germs can survive normal pool, hot tub, and spa levels of chlorine for several hours to days. Chlorine must be maintained at proper levels to kill most germs. The high water temperature of hot tubs and spas may cause chlorine to evaporate faster. As a result, chlorine levels in hot tubs and spas need to be checked more regularly than in swimming pools. Remember: even if you can smell the chlorine odor the water is not germ free. Skin infections are the most common infections spread through hot tubs and spas.” According to the CDC, “hot tub rash” is a common side effect of hanging out in a dirty hot tub.

If you’re ever at a frat party, steer clear of the hot tub. One of my friends who had the parties more in last years or so, has drastically changed his views after reading so many articles against the public hot tubs and saying, “In a recent study by Dr. Rita B. Moyes, a microbiologist at Texas A & M University, nearly all hot tubs house some type of microbial growth. In 95 percent of the tested tubs, bacteria derived from feces were present, while 81 per cent had fungi and 34 per cent contained potentially deadly staphylococcus bacteria. … The problems arise when the interior pipes of the spas are not properly maintained or chemically cleaned, and when the jets are operating germs are spewed out into the water. If tubs are routinely cleaned with the correct combination of chemicals, the likelihood for germ growth diminishes. But if I were to ever again be invited to a fraternity party, I would still avoid the hot tubs.”

A tad disturbing, huh? I know must have crashed all your fun and cherishing moments and even if you bath further, it will be full of fears, right? But it should be as the private tubs are the best solution to this problem.

What’s your take on all of this? Do you use public hot tubs? Ever gotten a rash from one–or something worse?

Share with us some of your thoughts and bitter experiences

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